Red Bull – Pull rod suspension detailed

Via Motorsport Magazin

From these images we can finally see some detail of the Red bull gearbox. Firstly the construction is carbon Fibre, which the team switched to mid way through 2009, in order to save weight over the old aluminium case.

Top wishbone location - via Motorsport Magazin

Then we can note the geometry of the wishbones, Red Bull followed high mounted wishbones since the RB5, the rear top wishbone (RTWB) being very high and near horizontal, being mounted to the ridge along to the top of the gearbox.

Differential - via Motorsport Magazin

Equally Red Bull have gone for a low differential, but the total effect is a very tall and bulky gearbox, albeit one that fits into the natural space created as the car tapers to the rear. But compared to Williams gearbox its clear to see where better airflow can be created at the tail of the car.

Pull Rod - via Motorsport Magazin

It’s rare to find pictures of the Red bull pull rod suspension. The low mounted mechanical parts normally covered by body panels and heat shielding. But here we can quite clearly see the pull rod leading down to the rocker. The pull rod is split to allow easy ride height changes by adding shims into the split and also allows the pull rod to be permanently mounted to the bearings on the rocker. When the rear wishbones are removed this lower part of the pullrod will remain with the gearbox. In turn the rocker operates the compliant elements of the rear suspension, the springs, dampers and heave elements.

Damper - Via Motorsport Magazin

The damper is clearly visible being mounted alongside the flanks of the gearbox case. The red anodized body and labels making it easy to spot. Note the rocker has a longer lever to operate the damper in comparison to the lever that the pull rod mounts to. This is to increase damper travel compared to wheel travel for greater wheel control.

rocker or Bell Crank - via Motorsport Magazin

Its not clear if the rocker works on a torsion bar t provide the rear springing, its believed Red Bull went away from torsion bars and individual wheel springs in 2009. Instead using the heave spring allied to the antiroll bar for a springless rear set up (read more at http://scarbsf1.wordpress.com/2010/12/03/spring-less-rear-suspension-a-quiet-revolution/). If a torsion bar is used it will need to run near vertically along the axis of the rocker.

Rocker to operate the Heave spring - via Motosport magazin

Not entirely visible is the heave control set up, this will consist of a Heave spring, damper andor bump rubbers, plus an inerter (not strictly for heave control but mounted in the same location). These run across the front of the gearbox, being mounted just above the clutch. We can see the splined end of the anti roll bar; the bar will have levers reaching forward to drop links that will provide the rear roll control.

Antiroll Bar location - via Motorsport Magazin

More on Pull Rods http://scarbsf1.wordpress.com/2010/10/10/red-bull-pull-rod-suspension-what-is-looks-like-how-it-benefits-aerodynamics/

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